Please select your page

About Us

WHAT IS LISHA?

The Long Island Speech-Language-Hearing Association (LISHA), founded in 1953, is a professional not-for-profit volunteer organization of over 1200 Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists.

THE ASSOCIATION:

  • Provides its members with educational and professional programs in the field of communication development and disorders
  • Promotes and maintains the highest professional and ethical standards within the profession
  • Offers a network of local professionals as a means of support
  • Supports research and improved educational standards
  • Encourages leadership roles and involvement within the organization and statewide associations
  • Advocates for the profession and also for individuals with communication disorders
  • Awards scholarships to graduate students in the field
  • Honors local organizations and treatment facilities

LISHA PROVIDES THE LONG ISLAND COMMUNITY WITH:

  • Resources for the community regarding speech-language and hearing issues
  • The latest information on legislative issues affecting individuals with disabilities
  • Speakers for school, community and professional groups
  • Public service announcements through our website
  • Responses to requests for information via the LISHA:
    • Website: www.lisha.org
    • Hotline: (516) 626-8000
    • E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    • Mail: PO Box 133, Mastic Beach, NY 11951-0133

VOLUNTEER

Volunteering is a great way to support an organization, and make a difference. It can also be an opportunity to meet people, learn new skills and share experiences, while serving your profession. Consider lending your time and talents to LISHA!

Contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and let us know you are interested.

WHAT IS A COMMUNICATION DISORDER?

Speaking, hearing and understanding are essential to human existence. A disorder in one or more of these abilities can interfere with a person's capacity to communicate, thus impacting overall quality of life.

WHAT ARE SOME SIGNS OF A COMMUNICATION DISORDER?

  • Difficulty understanding spoken language
  • Difficulty expressing thoughts or ideas
  • Delayed language development in comparison to other children of the same age
  • Difficulty formulating sentences due to errors in grammar and/or syntax
  • Word retrieval problems or difficulty with recall of information
  • Incorrect production of sounds that affect speech intelligibility
  • A disturbance in the normal fluency and time patterning of speech production
  • Chronic vocal hoarseness and/or other disturbances of vocal productions
  • Difficulties with feeding, chewing, and/or swallowing
  • Demonstrating inappropriate social skills

WHAT ARE SOME INDICATORS OF A HEARING PROBLEM?

  • An inability to hear and respond to speech and environmental sounds
  • Conversation is misunderstood
  • Failure to respond to familiar sounds
  • Frequent requests to repeat what was said
  • Ringing or buzzing sensation in the ear
  • Increased difficulty understanding speech in the presence of background noise
  • Raising television or radio volume
  • Difficulty hearing while using the telephone

COMMUNICATION FACTS:

  • Early identification and evaluation of a communication disorder lead to appropriate treatment(s)
  • Infant hearing screening can detect a possible hearing loss
  • Many potential communication disorders can be diagnosed from birth
  • Unidentified or untreated communication disorders can have behavioral, educational, social and vocational consequences
  • Prompt treatment of adult communication disorders resulting from trauma can facilitate increased potential for recovery of previous skill
  • Exposure to loud noise can damage hearing ability
  • Assistive listening devices can supplement the use of a hearing aid for difficult listening situations such as TV, phone use, movie and live theater environments
  • Improved communication skills can facilitate better quality of life for clients and their families
  • Speech-language therapy contributes to academic success

WHAT ARE THE QUALIFICATIONS OF AN AUDIOLOGIST OR SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST?

  • Audiologists hold a Master's or Doctoral degree, must be licensed by the State of New York and may be certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) with their Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) and/or the American Academy of Audiology (AAA)As of 2007, the Au.D. has replaced Masters-level audiology programs as the entry-level degree.
  • Speech-Language Pathologists hold a Master's or Doctoral degree, must be licensed by the State of New York, and may be certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) with their Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC)
  • Speech-Language Pathologists in public schools must hold New York State Education Department Licensure as a Teacher of the Speech and Hearing Handicapped (TSHH) or Teacher of Students with Speech and Language Disabilities (TSSLD)

WHAT DOES AN AUDIOLOGIST DO?

Audiologists are the primary health care professional who evaluate, diagnose, treat and manage hearing loss and balance disorders in adults and children by:

  • Fitting hearing aids and selecting FM systems
  • Evaluating for central auditory processing disorders (CAPD)
  • Aural rehabilitation
  • Assisting in cochlear implant programs
  • Performing ear or hearing related surgical monitoring
  • Designing and implementing hearing conservation and newborn hearing screening programs

WHAT DOES A SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST DO?

Speech-Language Pathologists are professionals trained in the study of human communication and its normal development. The SLPs diagnose and treat individuals with difficulties in the following areas:

  • Language development-spoken and written language: cognition and understanding related to learning and maximizing potential
  • Articulation and phonology
  • Auditory reception/listening skills
  • Social/Pragmatic aspects of communication
  • Feeding/Swallowing/Dysphagia
  • Oral motor skills
  • Fluency/Stuttering/Cluttering
  • Voice production/vocal quality
  • Non-Verbal/Augmentative/Alternative communication and technology devices